RESOURCES BY TOPICS

  • Delaware Councils & Public Meeting Calendar

    This section includes opportunities for student advocates, families and caregivers to learn about, participate and join statewide initiatives aiming to support and improve outcomes for children with disabilities and their families statewide.   Some resources include direct links to contact information, while other links may take you to a website for more information.

    Individuals with Disabilities birth – adult

    GACEC

    The mission of the Governor’s Advisory Council for Exceptional Citizens (GACEC) is to serve as the review board for policies, procedures and practices related to the delivery of services for all residents with exceptionalities or disabilities in Delaware from birth to death. The GACEC also serves as the state advisory panel for agencies providing educational services and programs to children (birth through age 26) in Delaware through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The primary function of the GACEC is to advise and advocate as necessary in order to achieve its mission. The GACEC holds monthly meetings which are open to the public.  See Delaware Public Meeting Calendar for meeting dates and agenda items (when available) here.

    GACEC General Membership Meeting
    Tuesday, February 16th, 2021, 7:00 pm—9:00 pm

     

    Delaware Public Meeting Calendar:

    Public meeting dates, and information on councils and committees in Delaware.  Please see individual council for contact information, subcommittee information and virtual and/or meeting location info.

    01:00 PM – 03:00 PM Monday January 25, 2021
    Meeting ID: 890 0748 8518 Passcode: 707731
    05:00 PM – 07:00 PM Tuesday January 26, 2021

    DDC – DELAWARE DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES COUNCIL

    The Delaware Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC) is authorized by Public Law 106-402 to address the unmet needs of people with developmental disabilities through system-wide advocacy, planning and demonstration projects.
    The Delaware DDC believes that all individuals should be included; all individuals should be able to exercise their rights and responsibilities; the needs of individuals and families should be met; supports should be person-centered; and equality should be promoted and the accepted standard.

    Are you a Delawarean with a Disability of Family Member/Caregiver? Here’s a chance to have your voice heard and make a DIFFERENCE!

    We will be having three public forums to give you an opportunity to provide your feedback on the draft of our DRAFT 2022-2026 Strategic Plan. These Public forums are free but registration is required. All public forums will take place virtually from 4 to 6 PM. We will have ASL sign language interpreters and close captioning present for all three events. Take part in Delaware Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Strategic plan process!!! Give your feedback during one of our public forums.

    New Castle County

    Tuesday, February 9th
    4pm-6pm

    Kent County

    Tuesday, February 16th
    4pm-6pm

    Sussex County

    Thursday, February 18th
    4pm-6pm

    Register here

    $100 Gift Card Give-Away at the End of Public Zoom Meeting

    Public comment can be submitted to Stefanie Lancaster at Stefanie.Lancaster@delaware.gov and/or Kristin Harvey at Kristin.Harvey@delaware.gov. Public comment will be accepted from January 22, 2021 through Close of Business March 7, 2021.

    If you need assistance providing feedback or require special accomodations for the Public Zoom meetings, please call our main office at (302) 739-3333.

     

    The Redding Consortium for Educational Equity

    Louis L. Redding grew up in Wilmington, Delaware, and graduated from Howard High School in 1919. He received degrees from Brown University and Harvard Law School. In 1929, Redding became the first black lawyer in Delaware. In 1950, he won a landmark case that resulted in the desegregation of the University of Delaware.

    He also presented legal arguments that helped cause the desegregation of schools in Claymont and Hockessin, Delaware, in the 1950s. In 1954, Redding assisted Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, in the Brown vs. Education case, which struck down the ”separate but equal“ system of public school segregation across the country.

    The Redding Consortium fights to ensure Redding’s vision actualizes and remains true.

     

    10:30-11:30 a.m. 

      • February 26
      • March 5
      • March 12
      • March 19
      • March 26
    Planning Team Meetings

    (Weekly on Friday’s)

    Join: https://udel.zoom.us/j/99593500134

    Meeting Materials

    Delaware Public Calendar

    See more information or to see upcoming events here.

     

    DDDS

    Include description or committee/task force or group and contact info/link

    SRC – State Rehabilitation Council

    Participants are appointed by the Governor, however meetings are open to general public (include link)

    DVI

     

    For Infants and Toddlers – Early Intervention

    SSIP

    Include description or committee/task force or group and contact info/link

    EHDI

    Transition Age Youth – Youth Self-Advocates

    PIC Youth Advisory Board

    DVR

    DVI

    DDC

    GACEC

     

    School District Initiatives

    School districts offer a number of opportunities for parents to learn more about schoolwide/districtwide strategic plans, parent leadership opportunities including parent councils, PTA/PTO and other parent led groups supporting students. Click on your school district’s link for more information.

    (list of school districts)

     

    Legislative Updates

     

     

     

    Category: OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUR VOICE TO BE HEARD, RESOURCES BY TOPICS

EDUCATION & SPECIAL EDUCATION K-12

School Choice Program & Students with Disabilities
School Choice Program & Students with disabilities (Creole)
Tips for Social Distancing
Eligibility for Special Education
  • Who is Eligible for Special Education?

    Children with disabilities are eligible for special education and related service when they meet IDEA’s (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) definition of a child with a disability.  If you suspect your child may qualify for special education services, the first step in this process is to talk with your child’s teachers about your concerns.  You can also request an evaluation to your child’s teacher and principal in writing.  This request may also be sent to the school special education coordinator or educational diagnostician.

    Additional Resources:

    Fact Sheet: “Eligibility for Special Education” for more information about the evaluation process.

    Online Demand Videos:  The following videos are available by accessing the online Video Portal

    • 5 Steps to Special Education
    • Getting Supports for your child – The IEP
    • Preparing for IEP Meetings

    Category: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS, EDUCATION & SPECIAL EDUCATION K-12, SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW & REGULATIONS

Video Portal
Eligibilty for Special Education
Questions about Evaluations
5 Steps in Special Education
Getting support for your child in school – The IEP
Preparing for IEP Meetings
Know your Rights: Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools
Challenging Behavior Fact Sheets (English & Spanish)
Understanding the Meaning of your child's behavior
IEP Meeting Planner
IEP Meeting Planner (Spanish)
IEP Planner Haitian Creole
Dispute Resolution Comparison Chart (CADRE)
Dispute Resolution Process Comparison Chart (pdf)
Publication: Parents are the Key
Conflict Resolution – January 24, 2018
  • Behavior and Discipline Toolkit

    Behaviors that interfere with a child’s learning in school can be challenging for both parents and teachers. This toolkit provides information about addressing behaviors through assessment of the child and development of a positive behavior intervention or support plan. It also includes information to help you understand school disciplinary procedures for children who receive special education services.

    Online Resources – National

    Online Resources – State

    Refer to individual school websites for each school’s “Code of Conduct” which includes disciplinary procedures for all students.

    PIC Fact sheets

    Discipline
    Functional Behaviora Assessment
    Behavior Intervention Plans

    Publications

    • Parents Are the Key – This user-friendly booklet, developed for parents and caregivers, describes school disciplinary procedures (such as suspensions and manifestation meetings) in detail. It also includes information about how school teams can address behaviors that are interfering with a child’s learning.

    Category: EDUCATION & SPECIAL EDUCATION K-12

Know Your Rights: Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools

LITERACY RESOURCES

  • Webinar: Dialogic Reading

    Dialogic Reading is a method of “shared reading” where families and children have a dialogue about the elements of the book and the child can connect the language and themes of the book to their own life. There are many benefits to dialogic reading for you and your child. Come learn about dialogic reading, how it will benefit your family, and where to find more information.

    Category: LITERACY RESOURCES, PRESENTATIONS, LITERACY

Dialogic Reading
Dialogic Reading Survey
  • Early Reader Checklist

    Is your home literacy friendly?

    This resource developed by ‘GetReadytoRead’

    You are your child’s first teacher. Your home is where your child will get his or her first experiences with books and reading.  This checklist developed by ‘GetReadytoReady’ is a way families can identify ways to increase literacy activities in the home.

    Category: LITERACY RESOURCES, LITERACY

Early Reader Checklist
Spelling Interventions for Struggling Readers
Part 1: A quick overview of the skills needed to become a good reader.
Part 2: An overview on early reading skills that parents can support.

SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW & REGULATIONS

  • Who is Eligible for Special Education?

    Children with disabilities are eligible for special education and related service when they meet IDEA’s (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) definition of a child with a disability.  If you suspect your child may qualify for special education services, the first step in this process is to talk with your child’s teachers about your concerns.  You can also request an evaluation to your child’s teacher and principal in writing.  This request may also be sent to the school special education coordinator or educational diagnostician.

    Additional Resources:

    Fact Sheet: “Eligibility for Special Education” for more information about the evaluation process.

    Online Demand Videos:  The following videos are available by accessing the online Video Portal

    • 5 Steps to Special Education
    • Getting Supports for your child – The IEP
    • Preparing for IEP Meetings

    Category: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS, EDUCATION & SPECIAL EDUCATION K-12, SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW & REGULATIONS

Video Portal
Eligibilty for Special Education
Questions about Evaluations
5 Steps in Special Education
Getting support for your child in school – The IEP
Preparing for IEP Meetings
Know Your Rights: Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools

STUDENTS AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITIES AGES 14-26

Using Assistive Technology to Manage Time and Stay Focused in College
Using Assistive Technolgoy to Manage Time
National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability - NCWD
NICHCY - Fact sheets about educational planning around transition issues encountered from school to adulthood and the importance of youth and parent involvement.
Center for Parent Information and Resources - Info on Transition and Post-High School Resources
National Technical Assistance Center on Transition (NTACT)
Transition Planning Resources - Delaware Department of Education
Delaware Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - State agency providing employment assistance to individuals with disabilities.
Delaware Division of Developmental Disabilities - State agency providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities.
Delaware Disability Hub
Preparing for your next IEP meeting
Publication: Parents are the Key
Know Your Rights: Students with Disabilities in Charter Schools

RESOLVING CONFLICTS WITH SCHOOLS/DISTRICTS

Dispute Resolution Comparison Chart (CADRE)
Dispute Resolution Process Comparison Chart (pdf)
Publication: Parents are the Key
Conflict Resolution – January 24, 2018

TRAUMA RESOURCES

Tips for Social Distancing
Trauma Informed Care - Tips for Teachers
Families and Schools Working Together
Tips for Child Welfare Staff
Children and Trauma: What you can do
What is Polyvictimization?
Child Trauma
  • Helping Traumatized Children Learn

    This resource, developed by the Massachusetts Advocates for Children in collaboration with Harvard Law School and The Task Force on Children Affected by Domestic Violence, includes research on the impact of trauma on learning in school, and includes policy recommendations that help create supportive environments to children and families impacted by trauma.

    Category: TRAUMA RESOURCES

Helping Traumatized Children Learn
Video: Why we Need Trauma-Sensitive Schools
Trauma related reports and Resources
  • Building Trauma Informed Families

    PRESENTER: Lydia C. DeBiase MSW, LCSW

    Ms. DeBiase is an alumna of Widener University and a full time faculty member since 2013. She has worked in the field of child welfare for 17 years as a case worker, supervisor, and manager. Additionally, she has been an outpatient and drug and alcohol therapist and conducted forensic substance use assessments at the Delaware County Juvenile Detention Center.

    The beginning of the year can be a wonderful time of growth and change for many people, but it also can be a time of stress and trauma.

    What does stress and trauma do to the body? How can you be proactive if you know you are entering into a stressful time of year? What are some resources at home and in school for your children after experiencing trauma.  
    This webinar will explore the standard definitions of trauma, Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and how they affect lifelong health, and how early childhood trauma impacts infant/child brain development.

    TOPICS COVERED

    • Standard definitions of trauma
    • Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)
    • ACE Scores
    • How early childhood trauma impacts the brain development of infants and children

    Category: TRAUMA RESOURCES

Building Trauma Informed Families – January 31, 2019
Webinar Survey: Please take a few minutes to complete the survey after viewing the webinar

RESOURCES FOR MILITARY FAMILIES

Military Families - Fact Sheet
  • Military Child Education Coalition

    A number of resources, publications, fact sheets and videos on education, transition, deployment and family separation, for military connected students and families.

    Happy family posing together at park

    happy american soldier reunited with family outside their home

    Category: RESOURCES FOR MILITARY FAMILIES

Military Child Education Coalition
Checklist for school transitions
Video: Transition Planning for military families of children with exceptional needs

INFANTS, TODDLERS, AND EARLY CHILDHOOD

  • Delaware’s Early Intervention System for Infants, and Toddlers with Disabilities and Their Families

    What is Early Intervention?

    Early intervention is a system of services that helps babies and toddlers with developmental delays or disabilities. Early intervention focuses on helping eligible babies and toddlers learn the basic and brand-new skills that typically develop during the first three years of life, such as:

    • physical (reaching, rolling, crawling, and walking);
    • cognitive (thinking, learning, solving problems);
    • communication (talking, listening, understanding);
    • social/emotional (playing, feeling secure and happy); and
    • self-help (eating, dressing)

    Examples of early intervention services

    If an infant or toddler has a disability or a developmental delay in one or more of these developmental areas, that child will likely be eligible for early intervention services. Those services will be tailored to meet the child’s individual needs and may include:

    • Assistive technology (devices a child might need)
    • Audiology or hearing services
    • Speech and language services
    • Counseling and training for a family
    • Medical services
    • Nursing services
    • Nutrition services
    • Occupational therapy
    • Physical therapy
    • Psychological services

    Additional Resources

     

    Category: FACT SHEETS, INFANTS, TODDLERS, AND EARLY CHILDHOOD

Delaware's Birth-to-Three website
Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers - HAITIANCREOLE
HAITIANCREOLE - Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) for Infants Toddlers with disabilities and their Families
SPANISH - Early Intervention for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilties and their Families
HAITIANCREOLE - Transition at age Three
Early Intervention Services for Infants, Toddlers and their Families
Indivuzlized Family Service Plan (IFSP) for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilties and their Families
Transition at Age Three
Challenging Behavior Fact Sheets (English & Spanish)
Understanding the Meaning of your child's behavior
Early Intervention Services for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities

BULLYING RESOURCES

Pacer's National Bullying Prevention Center
Delaware Department of Education
Notifying the school of bullying
Steps to Prevent Bullying

ENDREW F CASE

The Endrew F. Supreme Court Decision
  • Endrew F Resources

    THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT’S 2017 DECISION IN THE ENDREW F. CASE

    Both the Federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Delaware State law require that a free appropriate public education (FAPE) be made available to all eligible children with disabilities.  FAPE is an individualized program of special education and related services that are provided, at no cost to the parents, to a child with a disability according to that child’s IEP (individualized education program).

    The IEP is the written “blueprint” for each child with a disability that includes detailed information about the special education and related services the child will receive, including:

    • A statement of the child’s current levels of academic achievement and functional performance:
    • Goals for the child’s education;
    • How the child’s progress toward those goals will be measured;
    • The special education and related services and other services the child will receive;
    • The placement(s) in which the child will be educated.

    In its 1982 Rowley decision, the United States Supreme Court decided that a child would receive FAPE if the child’s IEP was “reasonably calculated to enable the child to achieve educational benefits.”  Since that time, many courts have interpreted the IDEA to require that this requirement is met if a child receives only more than “de minimis” (a little more than none) educational benefit.

    In its March 2017 decision in the Endrew F case, the Supreme Court went much further.  The Court stated that, “a student offered an educational program providing merely more than “de minimis” progress from year to year can hardly be said to have been offered an education at all.  The IDEA demands more.”  The Court’s decision means that the educational program for each child with a disability must be appropriately ambitious in light of his or her circumstances and every child should have the chance to meet challenging objectives.

    In developing a child’s IEP, the IEP team must consider what services and opportunities the child has been provided in the past, what progress the child has made in the past, and what changes are needed in services and learning opportunities offered to the child.  This requirement must be read in light of the IDEA’s requirement that the IEP must address how the child will be involved and progress in the general education curriculum.

    PIC Presentation – United States Supreme Court Decision  – Endrew F

     

    Survey for Endrew F presentation – Please complete after viewing the webinar.

    • Endrew F Fact Sheet
    • ENDREW F SUPREME COURT DECISION PRESENTATION
    • IEP Meeting Planner (PIC)
    • IEP Meeting Planner (PIC)-Spanish1

    Resources from Understood.org

    Category: ENDREW F CASE

Endrew F Fact Sheet
IEP Planner
IEP Planner (Spanish)

The Parent Information Center of Delaware is committed to providing access to our web pages for individuals with disabilities. The content of this site has been tested for usability and accessibility using a combination of standards-based, automated procedures and accepted heuristic methods. We make every effort to comply with the requirements of Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Compliance is an ongoing process and we encourage notification when information on our website is inaccessible. If for any reason you are having difficulty accessing any of our resources please call us at (302) 999-7394 or email us at picofdel@picofdel.org.